Society, state, and identity in African history
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Society, state, and identity in African history

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Published by Forum for Social Studies, Association of African Historians in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Bamako, Mali .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Ethnopsychology -- Africa -- Congresses,
  • Political psychology -- Congresses,
  • Group identity -- Political aspects -- Africa -- Congresses,
  • Identity (Psychology) -- Africa -- Congresses,
  • National characteristics, African -- Political aspects -- Congresses,
  • Comparative government -- Congresses,
  • Power (Social sciences) -- Africa -- Congresses,
  • Culture conflict -- Africa -- Congresses,
  • Ethnic conflict -- Africa -- Congresses,
  • Africa -- Politics and government -- Congresses

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Bahru Zewde.
GenreCongresses
ContributionsBahru Zewde., Congrès international des historiens africains (4th : 2007 : Addis Ababa, Ethiopia)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsGN645 .S635 2008
The Physical Object
Paginationiv, 430 p. :
Number of Pages430
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23912031M
ISBN 109994450255
ISBN 109789994450251
LC Control Number2009349419

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